Last Updated: March 01, 2015

Weather: Canberra 16°C - 30°C . Shower or two.

Wine (Viticulture)

Australian wine can succeed in Asia with the right approach, experts say

Vino boom: Chinese consumption of wine has doubled over the past five years. Picture: New

Vino boom: Chinese consumption of wine has doubled over the past five years. Source: News Limited

AUSTRALIAN wine can succeed in Asia with the right approach, experts say.

ANZ Bank head of agribusiness Mark Bennett told delegates at the Victorian Agribusiness Summit in Bendigo last week that the Chinesepreference in wine was for “quality, fruity red Australian varieties”.

“Chinese consumption of wine has doubled over the past five years. China holds 31 per cent of Australia’s total more-than-$10-a-bottle market,” Mr Bennett said.

“Within our region, China accounts for about 55.1 per cent of the total Asia-Pacific market by value, followed by Japan (15.2 per cent) and South Korea (1.6 per cent).”

Digital Insight Group Singapore director David Col­eman said global wine consumption had been on the rise since the late 1990s.

“Indonesia is capable of spending $3 million a month on wine,” he said.

“It spent $3.4 billion US in 2013. This will increase to $16.2 billion in 2020.”

Mr Coleman — a food and beverage marketing guru — said 92 per cent of Asian customers preferred peer references when choosing, rather than traditional advertising.

He said 50 per cent of a customer’s needs were met before they engaged a retailer and they wanted a wine that suited the occasion at a price that represented good value.

The Rabobank third-quarter wine report released last week said that with growth in mainstream demand for wine noticeably shifting towards new markets and consumers, the challenge for wine companies was how to adapt to an evolving consumer landscape.

“It appears that fortune favours the brave as market segmentation is ushering in a new wave of innovation in global wine styles, marketing and distribution,” Rabobank analyst Elena Saputo said.

“A consumer-centric approach will become key to drawing in — and remaining relevant to — new generations of wine drinkers as consumer preferences continue to evolve.

“One of the most important developments in today’s wine market is a shift in the consumer base, in both geographic and in demographic terms.”

In non-traditional wine-drinking countries, Millennials were drinking more wine than any of the previous generations did at their age, while in the traditional wine-drinking countries they were drinking less but better wine, Ms Saputo said.

Have your say

Skip to:
Read comments
Add comments

Add your comment on this story

Comments Form

1200 characters left

Your details
Post Options

TWE net profit slides

Wine Cellars for HOME WA

TREASURY Wine Estates half year results were a mere shadow of last year’s.

VFF focus on grain payment terms

VFF focus on grain payment terms

SHORTER payment terms for grain need to be considered as a solution to trader insolvencies, Jaala Pulford says.

GrainCorp profit expect to halve

GrainCorp Storages and farmers delivering crain

A SMALLER grain crop is likely to see GrainCorp’s full-year net profit fall to about half of last year’s result.

No beef with new language

 Beef carcasses at Radford's Warragul hanging by the tender-stretch method - a process to improve the tenderness of the the h...

THE Australian beef language is under review.

Organics grow to full-time business

Thorpdale Organics

THORPDALE Organics say organic food isn’t just for “wealthy” consumers and “old hippies”.

Anthrax kills Tatura cow

 Vic anthrax animal disease outbreak. bodies of infected cows being burnt near Tatura.

UPDATE: FARMERS in Northern Victorian are on high alert after a dairy cow died from anthrax disease.

Lalbert mourns favourite son

Lalbert mourns favourite son

UPDATE: THE Lalbert community has been plunged into mourning after the death of a Mallee Eagles footballer.

VFF focus on grain payment terms

VFF focus on grain payment terms

SHORTER payment terms for grain need to be considered as a solution to trader insolvencies, Jaala Pulford says.

One fast pass does it all

One fast pass does it all

NEW Amazone Cirrus 03 offset discs/drill combinations enable one-pass cultivation up to 18km/h.

Farmer Jack’s place

COUNTRY LIVING: Old sheep farmer Jack Stevens

I WAS intrigued to meet Jack Stevens, a 92-year-old farmer who lives and still works west of Euroa.

Livestock Doc: Not a scrap of trouble

FARM - PIGS at Corop with Katy Brown

THE dangers of swill feeding and why is it illegal in Australia.