Last Updated: November 28, 2015

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Coalition vows to get tough on anti-dumping and reverse onus of proof for Australian companies

ANTI-Dumping measures will get tougher in the wake of SPC Ardmona’s battles with imported fruit and tomatoes, the Federal Government says.

Industry Minister Ian Macfarlane has confirmed the Coalition will press ahead with measures that will include legislation to reverse the onus of proof on foreign suppliers, and speed up penalties against them.

The minister is also likely to penalise tomato importers who were earlier this month found to have “dumped” products on the Australian market.

The former Labor government and trade advocates have been opposed to reversing the onus of proof for overseas suppliers, because they said it flouted World Trade Organisation rules.

Liberal MP Sharman Stone has pushed Mr Macfarlane to “urgently” toughen the rules and has dismissed fears about retaliation from trade partners.

“Let’s test it and see. If we are the poor little pathetic scared people who always worry that someone might say ‘Just a minute’, then let’s forget our anti-dumping regime and continue as before,” Dr Stone said.

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Comments on this story

  • Ray from Melbourne of Melbourne Posted at 2:13 PM February 20, 2014

    Australia is no longer a country of ten or so billion sheep exporting people, we are now 22 billion very diverse people, Australia is the 12th largest economy in the world, knocking off Italy last year, it is about time we start telling other countries what to do and not be scared of the consequences.


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